Wachtell responds to Bebchuk and Jackson’s Toward a Constitutional Review of the Poison Pill

In a recent paper, Professors Lucian Bebchuk and Robert Jackson have extended Professor Bebchuk’s extreme and eccentric campaign against director-centric governance into a new realm—that of the Constitution of the United States. They claim that “serious questions” exist about the constitutionality of the poison pill—or, more precisely, “about the validity of the state-law rules that authorize the use of the poison pill.” It is likely, they argue, that these state-law rules violate the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution, and are thus preempted, because they frustrate the purposes of the Williams Act, the 1968 federal statute that governs tender-offer timing … Read more

Wachtell Update on the Halliburton Fraud-on-the-Market Case

As we have described in our prior memos (here and here), in Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc., No. 13-317, the Supreme Court will decide whether or not to abandon the “fraud on the market” presumption of reliance that has facilitated class-action treatment of claims brought under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and SEC Rule 10b–5.  The case will be argued before the Court on March 5, and a decision will likely come by the end of June.  As our earlier memos explained, Halliburton is potentially the most important securities case … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Wachtell Update on the Halliburton Fraud-on-the-Market Case

Federal District Court Expresses Skepticism That Dodd-Frank Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Provision Overturns Morrison in Government Enforcement Actions

Federal District Court Expresses Skepticism That Dodd-Frank Extraterritorial
Jurisdiction Provision Overturns Morrison in Government Enforcement Actions

In a memo we wrote on the day the Dodd-Frank Act was signed into law, we discussed a provision in that law seemingly intended to render the Supreme Court’s decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank inapplicable to cases brought by the SEC or the Justice Department. We noted that this “extraterritorial jurisdiction” provision, Section 929P(b), contains a significant drafting error, one that likely makes it a practical nullity. Since then, much academic commentary has concurred in our view. Last week, a federal … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Wachtell's George Conway on District Court Skepticism That Dodd-Frank Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Provision Overturns Morrison

Applying Morrison v. National Australia Bank, the Supreme Court Rejects Extraterritorial Application of the Alien Tort Statute

Editors Note:  The author, a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz argued the Morrison case for the defendants in the Supreme Court.

Just as it extinguished class-action litigation tourism under the Securities Exchange Act three years ago in Morrison v. National Australia Bank, the U.S. Supreme Court, invoking Morrison, today abruptly ended the burgeoning use of the Alien Tort Statute to litigate extraterritorial torts.  Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., No. 10-1491 (U.S. Apr. 17, 2013).

Enacted in 1789, the ATS provides that federal district courts have “jurisdiction of any civil action by an alien for … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Wachtell's Conway discusses SUpreme Court's recent application of Morrison v. NAB to the Alien Tort Statute

Wachtell Discusses the Supreme Court’s Decision in Amgen

A divided Supreme Court ruled on February 27th that proof of materiality is not a prerequisite to certification of a Rule 10b-5 securities fraud class action. Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans and Trust Funds, No. 11-1085 (Feb. 27, 2013).

The elements of a Rule 10b-5 claim include proof of a material misrepresentation or omission and reliance upon such misrepresentation or omission. Plaintiffs in securities fraud class actions typically seek to invoke the “fraud-on-the-market” presumption set out in Basic Inc. v. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988) to establish reliance. In Basic, a case in which only a … Read more