The Value of Unicorns and “Worthless” Companies Explained

In a new paper, “Worthless Companies,” I explain how companies with worthless assets can have substantial equity value on efficient markets and debt that trades near par, so long as an irrational bidder may acquire the company.

Consider a firm with a market value of more than $1 billion. The firm has sales under $1 billion and has never been profitable. The firm describes its mission as, “to make incredible home cooking accessible to everyone,” and its business is to sell ready-to-prepare meals. Or consider a firm with a market value of more than $8 billion with revenues of just … Read more

What Corporate Law’s Emphasis on the Long Term Might Mean

To read influential corporate lawyers, legal academics, and jurists, shareholders are an alarmingly myopic bunch who demand that corporate directors and managers make short-term decisions that sacrifice long-term value. The group receiving the most scolding of late is hedge fund activists. Leo E. Strine, Jr. the chief justice of the Delaware Supreme Court and a commentator on corporate law, says we “must recognize that directors are increasingly vulnerable to pressure from activist investors and shareholder groups with short-term objectives, and that this pressure may logically lead to strategies that sacrifice long-term performance for short-term shareholder wealth.” Delaware corporate law enshrines … Read more

Is the Event Study Methodology Reliable In Securities Litigation?

In Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc., 134 S. Ct. 2398 (2014), known as Halliburton II, the U.S. Supreme Court held that defendants may defeat the fraud-on-the-market presumption of reliance at the class-certification stage with evidence that the misrepresentation did not in fact affect the stock price. Securities litigants typically use event study methodology to detect and measure price impacts. Halliburton II will increase the ever-present role of event study methodology in securities litigation. Our new paper, Event Studies in Securities Litigation: Low Power, Confounding Effects, and Bias, explores the reliability of event studies in … Read more