Too Big and Unable to Fail

Financial regulation after the Dodd-Frank Act was enacted in 2010 has produced a blizzard of acronyms, many of which revolve around the basic “too big to fail” problem.  OLA, OLF, SPOE, and TLAC are new regulatory tools that seek to build a regime for resolving failures of systemically important financial institutions.  “Resolution” is the financial industry’s favored term for what most people would simply call “bankruptcy” or, more politely, “restructuring.”

The explicit goal of this new “resolution” regime is to enable a large financial institution (or SIFI, to use another favored acronym) to go bankrupt without a government bailout.  Just … Read more

Failure of the Clearinghouse: Dodd-Frank’s Fatal Flaw?

As is well known, a key feature of the Dodd-Frank Act is the effort to treat swaps more like commodities. In particular, large categories of swaps are to be centrally cleared, replacing the pre-Lehman OTC model with a commodities model that has worked reasonably well for decades.

But the result is to massively increase the importance of the clearinghouses in the global financial system. Clearinghouses are regulated, but given the vital place of clearinghouses in Dodd-Frank, it is surprising that Dodd-Frank makes no clear provision for the failure of a clearinghouse.

Given the key role that clearinghouses will play in … Read more