Stanley Fischer

Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer discusses Nonbank Financial Intermediation, Financial Stability, and the Road Forward

It is an honor to speak at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta’s 20th Financial Markets Conference, and I am grateful to President Lockhart and the organizers for inviting me to do so.[1] This evening I would like to take stock of progress on financial reforms in the nonbank financial sector and highlight some principles for approaching prudential regulation of this sector to further strengthen financial stability.

The nonbank sector includes firms with diverse business models and practices, many of which differ greatly from those of banks. Even so, nonbank firms and activities can pose the same key vulnerabilities … Read more

Davis Polk discusses SEC Issuance of Reporting Rules for Security-Based Swaps

On February 11, 2015, the Securities and Exchange Commission issued a final rule (the “Final Rule”) and proposed amendments (the “Proposed Rule”) on the reporting and public dissemination of security-based swap (“SBS”) information, as mandated by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Notably, the SEC:

  • delayed establishing a final compliance schedule for SBS reporting;
  • left many details of SBS reporting, including many of the required data elements, the format of reports and the assignment of product identifiers for standardized SBS, to registered security-based swap data repositories (“SBSDRs”);
  • created an interim phase for the reporting of SBS information,

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Fried Frank discusses Annual Report from CFIUS to Congress – Data Highlight Extent of CFIUS’ Reach

The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (“CFIUS”), a multi-agency U.S. regulatory body empowered to review transactions involving a foreign person and a U.S. business that may affect U.S. national security, recently delivered its unclassified Annual Report to Congress for the calendar year 2013 (“Annual Report”).[1] In accordance with the legal prohibition against public disclosure of such information, the Annual Report contains no information with respect to specific transactions. Nonetheless, it remains a remarkable window into the reach and operation of CFIUS, and its impact on transactions involving U.S. businesses.

As in previous years, and as required … Read more

Clifford Chance discusses Setting a New Benchmark

The Council of the EU has reached political agreement on the EU Benchmark Regulation (the Regulation). The legislation will impose controls on a range of financial market activity that uses interest rate, currency, commodity and other indices to set prices and contract values. Although not yet finalised the new rules are expected to be published later this year and apply in 2016. The Regulation is expansive in scope, covering not only indices such as LIBOR and the DAX but also many other less obvious ‘benchmarks’. The new rules could lead to the transformation or even disappearance of some benchmarks, presenting … Read more

Kirkland & Ellis discusses China Continuing its Aggressive Anti-Monopoly Law Enforcement With a Record-Breaking $975 Million Fine Against Qualcomm

Earlier this week, China’s antitrust regulators started off 2015 with a continuation of last year’s aggressive enforcement of the Anti-Monopoly Law (“AML”) by levying an almost $1 billion fine against Qualcomm, about 8 percent of the company’s 2013 China revenue — equaling the highest percentage penalty previously dispensed under the AML, but short of the 10 percent maximum allowable. The penalty ends the NDRC’s first “abuse of dominance” investigation.1  The fine is greater than the total amount of 2014 NDRC AML fines and is five times the combined $202 million fines against the 12 Japanese auto parts and bearings … Read more

Key Speakers At Seminars At The IMF & World Bank Annual Meetings

Chair Yellen discusses Improving the Oversight of Large Financial Institutions

Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today, it is great to be back in New York. The Citizens Budget Commission has played an important role over the years as a forum to discuss issues of interest to New Yorkers that are often also of national and even global importance. Given New York’s preeminence as a center of global finance, I thought it would be appropriate to discuss just such a topic, which is how the Federal Reserve oversees the largest financial institutions, many of which are headquartered or have a major presence here, and how that oversight … Read more

Commissioner J. Christopher Giancarlo

A Pro-Reform Reconsideration of the CFTC Swaps Trading Rules

The following post is taken from an address by CFTC Commissioner J. Christopher Giancarlo before the ABA Business Law Section, Derivatives & Futures Law Committee Winter Meeting and is dated January 23, 2015.  Commissioner Giancarlo’s address may be accessed here.

Thank you for the kind introduction.

Let me begin with the disclaimer that my remarks today reflect my own views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC or Commission), my fellow Commissioners or the CFTC staff.

It is an honor to speak to you today. I see so many truly distinguished members … Read more

Powell

Comments on the Fair and Effective Markets Review

I want to thank the Brookings Institution for inviting me to comment today on Martin Wheatley’s presentation on the Fair and Effective Markets Review (Review).[1] The Review is an ambitious and important initiative. Although London is perhaps the leading center for many fixed-income, currency, and commodities (FICC) markets, these markets are global, and the United States and the largest U.S. firms play key roles in them. So the Review addresses issues that affect our markets as well.

The Review looks to identify further steps that should be taken to restore public confidence in FICC markets in the wake of the … Read more

Goncharov Igor and Peter Caspar

Greater Disclosure Harms Cartels

The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that breaking up illegal cartels leads to consumer savings of at least 10% of annual sales in the relevant market. However, from the regulator’s perspective it is notoriously difficult to identify cartels. Even more difficult is to prove that some illegal conspiracy actually occurred: Do companies coordinate their actions by means of informal meetings in a hotel room in some remote location? Or do companies act after observing each other’s actions without exchanging a word or a text message? Both ways to coordinate actions may reduce consumer welfare, while only the former is punishable … Read more

ZavvosKaltsouni

The Single Resolution Mechanism in the European Banking Union

With the adoption of the Single Resolution Mechanism (SRM) the European Union (EU) established the second crucial pillar of the European Banking Union (EBU), further promoting the financial stability and efficiency of the European banking system. The EU made this significant progress not by design but by the force of necessity – the crisis rendered compelling the centralization of powers for the supervision and resolution of banks at the EU (‘federal’) level. This article briefly introduces the structural components of SRM, as well as discusses the decision-making process for the placement of a bank … Read more

Morrison & Foerster discusses EU Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive and European Single Resolution Mechanism

2014 was a very active year for financial regulation in the European Union (EU). There was a push to finalise much of the outstanding primary legislation on the regulatory reform agenda in advance of the European Parliamentary elections in May 2014. This resulted in the adoption of many EU Regulations and Directives in the first half of the year. However, much still remains in the in-box of EU legislators and regulators. Most of the legislation that has been adopted envisages a significant amount of further legislation and rulemaking regulation in the form of delegated regulations to be adopted

Read more

BCG discusses the “Brave New Era” of Comprehensively Regulated Banks

Global banking has entered a new era in which every region, product, and legal entity is going to be closely regulated.

To assess the current status and future effects of regulatory reform, we have classified the entire spectrum of regulatory reforms, grouping them into three clusters: financial stability, prudent operations, and resolution and separation. (See Exhibit 1.)

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Financial Stability: Expectations Exceed Regulators’ Intent

Since the crisis began, establishing and safeguarding global and local financial stability have been regulators’ highest priorities. As a result, financial stability is the most developed area of reform. Fundamental requirements have been revised or reinstated, primarily … Read more

sarah paterson

Rethinking the Role of the Law of Corporate Distress in the Twenty-First Century

Thomas Jackson famously described the role of all bankruptcy law as reducing the incentive for individual enforcement against the assets of a distressed company.[1] Although scholars have debated other aspects of Jackson’s thesis, most have continued to identify with this as a central tenet of bankruptcy law. In a recent working paper, Rethinking the Role of the Law of Corporate Distress in the Twenty-First Century, I propose a new taxonomy: the law of corporate distress comprised of insolvency law and restructuring law. I suggest that Thomas Jackson’s description remains apt for part of that taxonomy but draw a distinction … Read more

elizabeth.howell

Short Selling Reporting Rules in the EU and the US: A Greenfield Area

The following post comes from Elizabeth Howell, a doctoral student in law at the University of Oxford and a visiting scholar at Columbia Law School in the Fall Semester 2014. It is related to her paper, ‘Short Selling Reporting Rules in the EU and the US: A Greenfield Area’ that is forthcoming in the European Company Law Journal. Further details are available here http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2536523.

Short selling reporting obligations can be helpful to regulators, particularly in relation to deterring abusive behavior. Following the recent financial crisis, the European Short Selling Regulation (the ‘Regulation’)[1] introduced a common framework for short … Read more

Matthias Lehmann Photo

Structural Reform of Banking Systems: The Global Impact of Legal Fragmentation

One of the key issues in the on-going overhaul of the global financial system is the structural reform of banking systems. Legislatures in different states, e.g. the United States, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, have all taken measures to protect individual depositors’ assets against losses from risky bank activities. On 29 January 2014, the European Commission joined the transnational effort by publishing its own proposal on the subject. Each measure is slightly different. There are good reasons to wonder about the effect that this type of legal fragmentation will have on the global financial system. In a recent paper … Read more

Baker Botts discusses the Reach of the Sherman Act

In a decision that could have far-reaching implications for U.S. companies and consumers, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently reiterated that the U.S. antitrust laws stop at the border and do not reach conduct that causes damages in the first instance outside the United States.

In Motorola Mobility LLC v. AU Optronics Corp., No. 14-8003, 2014 WL 6678622 (7th Cir. Nov. 26, 2014), issued shortly before Thanksgiving, the Court dismissed a Sherman Act Section 1, 15 U.S.C. § 1, claim brought by Motorola against members of the liquid crystal display (“LCD”) cartel and affirmed summary judgment for defendants.… Read more

Commissioner Mark Wetjen

Ensuring the Promise of a Centrally Cleared, Global Swaps Market: Next Steps

These remarks were made by Commissioner Mark P. Wetjen before the Futures Industry Association Asia Derivatives Conference

Thank you for that kind introduction, and my thanks as well to the Futures Industry Association for having me here to speak at this year’s Asia Derivatives Conference. I am honored to be with you in Singapore. I want to give a special thanks to my good friend, Walt Lukken, who has shown tremendous leadership in his role at the FIA.

While traveling in Asia this week and meeting with members of the derivatives community, I’ve been struck by both the vastness and … Read more

Erica Gorga (Yale)

The Impact of the Financial Crisis on Nonfinancial Firms: The Case of Brazilian Corporations and the “Double Circularity” Problem in Transnational Securities Litigation

This Article discusses the impact of the international financial crisis on Brazilian capital markets. While the banking industry was not significantly affected, leading nonfinancial corporations experienced severe financial turmoil. Two Brazilian corporations cross-listed in the United States — Sadia S.A. and Aracruz Celulose S.A. — suffered billion-dollar losses when the Brazilian real unexpectedly plummeted in relation to the dollar. These great losses were found to be the result of their highly speculative trading in currency derivatives, despite earlier disclosure that these companies had engaged only in pure hedging activity. Consequently, several private lawsuits were filed both in the United States … Read more

PwC discusses Basel’s Final Net Stable Funding Ratio

On October 31st, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) issued its final Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR), which was originally introduced by BCBS in 2010 and re-proposed in January 2014. The NSFR compares the amount of a firm’s available stable funding (ASF, the ratio’s numerator) to its required stable funding (RSF, the ratio’s denominator) to measure how the firm’s asset base is funded. The NSFR is seen by BCBS as a complement to its previously finalized Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR) – recently implemented in the US as a final rule[1] – which is intended to promote short term resilience … Read more

Mayer Brown discusses “Separate Entity” Rule in New York

In a much anticipated decision, New York’s highest court, the Court of Appeals, confirmed on October 23, 2014, that the so-called “separate entity” rule continues to exist as a vibrant doctrine in the State of New York. Under the separate entity rule, a bank’s branches in different jurisdictions are treated as “separate entities” for various purposes, including judgment enforcement.[1] The court’s decision in Motorola Credit Corp. v. Standard Chartered Bank,[2] clears up some of the uncertainties created by that court’s 2009 decision in Koehler v. Bank of Bermuda Ltd., and marks an important victory for the banking community.… Read more