A Primer on the Uncorporation

More and more companies appear with strange abbreviations behind their business name. Consider Chrysler Group LLC (instead of Inc.) or LVMH Montres & Joaillerie France SAS. Some even speak about the “endangered corporate form” and point to the rise of the uncorporation. In the paper, “A Primer on the Uncorporation, ” Erik Vermeulen, Priyanka Priydershini and I examine how the uncorporation has evolved in the United States and, more recently, in other economies around the world. The growth in non-listed business forms in Europe, Latin America and Asia has been shaped by a mixture of learning and professional advice arising … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Joe McCahery of Tilberg University School of Law discusses his recent work on Uncorporations

Regulatory Competition and Anticorruption Law

My paper, Regulatory Competition and Anticorruption Law, which was recently published in the Virginia Journal of International Law, responds to arguments that the recent increase in European enforcement of anti-bribery laws has created a risk of overenforcement. Critics of the current international regime, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and several academics, have argued that cracking down on bribery of government officials by rich-world firms will leave the field open to multinationals whose home countries do not care about corruption (China and India typically are mentioned). These critics would have the United States relax its international bribery rules by … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Professor Paul Stephan of UVA law discusses international bribery rules and the dynamics of regulatory competition.

The ICE Acquisition of NYSE Is a Failure for Europe

In 2011, the Deutsche Boerse Group launched an offer on the New York Stock Exchange. Everybody expected that the U.S. authorities would object to this foreign acquisition of the most iconic Stock Exchange in the United States, and arguably in the world. Not only did it not happen, but very quickly the U.S. Department of Justice, quite naturally, concluded that there was no antitrust issue. Incidentally, NASDAQ made a desperate attempt to purchase the NYSE for $11.8 billion and the merger of the two largest cash equity exchanges of the United States was stiffly rejected by the U.S. authorities. Even … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Georges Ugeux, CEO of Galileo Global Advisors, opines on the ICE acquisition of NYSE

Why Did Australia Fare So Well in the Global Financial Crisis?

Not all jurisdictions around the world suffered the effects of the so-called “global” financial crisis equally. Even among common law countries, which are routinely bundled together in much academic literature, the impact of the crisis varied significantly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

The crisis proved dire for some common law countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom. Others, however, including Australia and Canada, were considerably more fortunate. Although there were over fifty government-sponsored bank bailouts around the globe during the crisis, including in the United States and the United Kingdom, there were no such bailouts in either Australia … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Professor Jennifer G. Hill of the University of Sydney discusses why Australia fared so well in the recent financial crisis.

A Comparative Analysis of Shadow Banking Reforms by the FSB, USA and EU

The year 2013 is likely to be a watershed time in the development of shadow banking oversight and regulation. Of particular note are three upcoming developments: (1) the Financial Stability Board (the FSB) has commenced public consultations on its initial proposals and final recommendations are scheduled to be released in September 2013; (2) the USA will soon begin designating its first nonbank Systemically Important Financial Institutions (SIFIs), and will clarify its plans for regulating such entities in practice; and (3) the European Systemic Risk Board is preparing to recommend shadow banking oversight changes in early 2013. It is therefore an … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Cleary's Ed Greene and Elizabeth Broomfield discuss their comparative analysis of shadow banking reforms by the FSB, USA, and EU.

Reputation is crucial for bank investors

The humbling of two global banks in recent weeks has been greeted very differently on opposite sides of the Atlantic. Still, from the perspective of either side, large fines for interest rate rigging by Swiss bank UBS, and money-laundering by HSBC, point to the same conclusion: from now on, banks must protect their reputations as their most valuable asset.

On the US side, there has been considerable grumbling about the “lenient” treatment meted out to HSBC and UBS. Associations with Mexican drug cartels and Iranian militants or documented solicitation of price fixing usually attract the attention of federal prosecutors. Yet, … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Professor John Coffee of Columbia Law School opines on the importance of reputation for bank investors

Binding Shareholder Say-on-Pay Vote in UK

In 2002, the UK began requiring an advisory shareholder vote on the annual executive and non-executive director compensation practices of UK-incorporated quoted companies (“UK Companies”). Eight years later, in July 2010, the US followed suit when President Obama signed into law the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), providing for an advisory say-on-pay vote for most large US public companies.

The UK government has now gone one step further by proposing to reform the approval process for director remuneration, including through the introduction of a binding shareholder vote for all UK Companies that must occur … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Binding Shareholder Say-on-Pay Vote in UK http://wp.me/p2TTaz-2m