Credit Risk Retention: Agencies Propose Revised Rule

The following is a joint press release from six federal agencies on the revised credit risk retention rule, available here.

Six federal agencies on Wednesday issued a notice revising a proposed rule requiring sponsors of securitization transactions to retain risk in those transactions. The new proposal revises a proposed rule the agencies issued in 2011 to implement the risk retention requirement in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act).

This proposal is being issued jointly by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Federal Deposit … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Credit Risk Retention: Agencies Propose Revised Rule http://wp.me/p2Xx5U-1lX

The Geography of Revlon-Land in Cash and Mixed Consideration Transactions: A Response to Professor Bainbridge

The following comes to us from Mohsen Manesh, an Assistant Professor at the University of Oregon School of Law.

In the recently published The Geography of Revlon-Land,[1] Professor Stephen Bainbridge attempts to crisply delineate the boundaries and contours of the evolving doctrine first articulated by the Delaware Supreme Court in Revlon, Inc. v. MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings, Inc.[2]— or Revlon-land, more colloquially. The Revlon doctrine famously dictates that in certain transactions involving the “sale or change in control” of a corporation, the corporation’s board of directors has a duty to “get[] the … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Prof. Manesh of Oregon Law Respond to Bainbridge on Revlon-Land

The Marketplace of Ideas: Rethinking the Disclosure of Beneficial Ownership under Section 13(d)

The CLS Blue Sky Blog presents the third installment of our series,  “The Marketplace of Ideas.”  Earlier installments are available here and here.  The intent is to present different perspectives on the same subject by two or more authors.

Today, the subject is how the SEC should respond to Dodd Frank’s invitation to rethink the disclosure of beneficial ownership under Section 13(d).  We have asked a number of experts for their views.

Our first release, Proposals to “Reform” the Section 13D Rules:  Getting it Precisely Backwards, comes to us from Professors Ronald J. Gilson of Columbia and Stanford … Read more

Proposals to “Reform” the Section 13D Rules: Getting it Precisely Backwards

The current proposals to accelerate the timing of beneficial ownership disclosure under Section 13(d) of the 1934 Securities Exchange Act and to broaden the definition of beneficial ownership to include derivative positions that provide economic exposure to stock price movement but not a right to vote or acquire stock, gets the problem precisely backwards.  The mismatch of problem and solution is apparent when we focus on two dates:  1968, when the Williams Act adding Section 13 was adopted, and 2010, when Section 766 of the Dodd-Frank legislation gave the SEC the authority, but not the obligation, to consider whether derivative … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 1 Comment  
Editor's Tweet: Profs. Gilson and Gordon on Proposals to “Reform” the Section 13D Rules: Getting it Precisely Backwards

Disclosure Is Still the Best Policeman!

In a delightful essay, Ron Gilson and Jeff Gordon remind us that the times have changed and the Williams Act belongs in their view to the era of the Beatles. (Personally, I have trouble believing that Sgt. Pepper was really that long ago.  Next, they will try to tell me that John Lennon is dead).  Even if they are right, I must respond with a counter-truism.  Plus ca change, plus la meme chose.  And I will raise their bid, by invoking two other familiar maxims:  First, power corrupts, and absolute power is at least within view for institutional … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 3 Comments  
Editor's Tweet: John Coffee on why Disclosure Is Still the Best Policeman in the 13(d) Debate

Sullivan & Cromwell discusses SIGA Technologies, Inc. v. Pharmathene, Inc.

In an opinion issued on May 24, 2013,[1] the Delaware Supreme Court reaffirmed that an express contractual obligation to negotiate an agreement in good faith is enforceable and held that expectation damages[2] are available for breach of that obligation if the court is reasonably certain that the contracting parties would have reached an agreement but for the defendant’s bad faith, assuming the damages can be ascertained with reasonable certainty. The case serves as a useful reminder that care should be taken in drafting term sheets or other preliminary documents and that obligations to negotiate in good faith should be taken

Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Delaware Reaffirms Express Obligation to Negotiate Agreement in Good Faith Is Enforceable and Holds Expectation Damages Are Available

Journeys in Revlon-Land with a Conflicted Financial Advisor

When the board of directors of a Delaware corporation begins a process that results in a change of control of the company (typically, a cash-out merger), the board’s Revlon duties are triggered: the directors then have a fiduciary obligation to take reasonable steps to get for the shareholders the best price reasonably available. In my recent article, Journeys in Revlon-Land With a Conflicted Financial Advisor: Del Monte and El Paso, I discuss two cases in which the Delaware Court of Chancery considered claims that a board of directors had breached its Revlon duties because its financial advisor had a … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Professor Robert T. Miller of the University of Iowa College of Law discusses Revlon duties with a Conflicted Financial Advisor

Honored in the Breach: Diverging Law and Practice in Tender Offers for Debt Securities

The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Jones Day or its clients.

In a recent article in the NYU Journal of Law & Business, we discuss some of the legal and regulatory concerns that have arisen in structuring tender offers for debt securities.  The paper’s title refers to a divergence that has developed between accepted market practices and the legal framework that is supposed to govern them.  This divergence is grounded in the SEC’s reliance on no-action letters as a regulatory mechanism to address developing market practices, … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Haag and Keller discuss Diverging Law and Practice in Tender Offers for Debt Securities

Gibson Dunn on Controlling Shareholders and the Business Judgment Rule in Going Private Merger Transactions

On May 29, 2013, Chancellor Leo E. Strine, Jr. of the Delaware Court of Chancery issued an important decision that lays the foundation for controlling stockholders to pursue going-private merger transactions with the comfort that, if certain conditions are met, such transactions will be reviewed under the deferential business judgment rule standard, rather than the exacting entire fairness standard.   

In In re MFW Shareholders Litigation, C.A. No. 6566-CS (Del. Ch. May 29, 2013), Chancellor Strine considered a question of law that had long vexed the deal community: whether a controlling stockholder that expressly conditions a going-private merger transaction on Read more

Editor's Tweet | 1 Comment  
Editor's Tweet: Gibson Dunn on Controlling Shareholders and the Business Judgment Rule in Going Private Merger Transactions http://wp.me/p2Xx5U-123

Wachtell on Controlling Shareholders and the Business Judgment Rule in Going Private Merger Transactions

The Delaware Court of Chancery this week held that the use of both an independent special committee and a majority-of-the-minority vote condition in a go-private merger between a controlled company and its controlling stockholder will result in application of the deferential business judgment rule standard of review rather than the onerous entire fairness standard.  In re MFW S’holders Litig., C.A. No. 6566-CS (Del. Ch. May 29, 2013).

The case arose out of a stockholder challenge to a merger in which MacAndrews & Forbes acquired the 57% of M&F Worldwide it did not already own.  The transaction was subject to … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 2 Comments  
Editor's Tweet: Wachtell Discusses Court of Chancery's Application of the Business Judgment Rule to Controlling Stockholder Mergers http://wp.me/p2Xx5U-11H

The Marketplace of Ideas: Professor Coffee and Brandon Gold on the Wachtell Bylaw

The CLS Blue Sky Blog presents its first installment of our new series, entitled “The Marketplace of Ideas.”  The intent is to present different perspectives on the same subject by two or more authors.

Today, Professor John C. Coffee, Jr. of Columbia Law School responds to Mr. Brandon Gold, a fellow in the Harvard Law School Program on Corporate Governance, who will be an associate with Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP this fall.  Mr. Gold’s post, available here, argues, for a number of reasons, that a proposed bylaw suggested by Wachtell, Lipton is overbroad and potentially invalid.

The proposed … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 9 Comments  
Editor's Tweet: Introducing "The Marketplace of Ideas" Professor Coffee and Brandon Gold offer different views on the Wachtell Bylaw

The Wachtell Bylaw: A Balanced Perspective

In a free-swinging and provocative attack, Brandon Gold, a graduating Harvard Law School student, argues (1) that third party bonuses, paid by hedge funds or others soliciting proxies, to their director nominees are acceptable and even desirable, and (2) that a proposed bylaw, drafted by Wachtell, Lipton, that would disqualify nominees who were parties to any such agreement or understanding or who have received such compensation from third parties is invalid.  Only the second of these questions involves much nuance, but both are worth exploring.

Mr. Gold’s first assertion that such “pay for performance” compensation arrangements for directors are desirable … Read more

Why the Wachtell Bylaw on Director Compensation by Shareholders is Overbroad and May Fail Blasius Scrutiny

The following post comes to us from Brandon S. Gold, a fellow in the Harvard Law School Program on Corporate Governance.  Beginning in the Fall, Brandon will be an associate with Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP.

In a recent memorandum to clients shared on this blog, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz urged companies to adopt a bylaw that would effectively prevent hedge funds and other shareholders from offering their director nominees compensation arrangements such as “pay-for-performance” plans.[1] In an effort to weaken shareholder activists, Wachtell has ignored arguments it has been making for decades and has treated the … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 1 Comment  
Editor's Tweet: Brandon Gold discusses why the Wachtell Bylaw on director compensation by shareholders is overbroad and may fail blasius scrutiny

Sullivan & Cromwell Discusses last week’s new development in Delaware on “Don’t Ask, Don’t Waive” Standstills

In a preliminary injunction opinion issued on May 21, 2013, the Delaware Court of Chancery (VC Glasscock) found that the board of directors of NetSpend Holdings Inc., comprised of four directors representing private equity-affiliated stockholders that owned over 45% of NetSpend’s shares, three independent directors and the CEO, likely failed to satisfy their so-called “Revlon” duties to attempt to secure the best value reasonably attainable when agreeing to sell the company to Total Systems Services, Inc. (“TSYS”) in an all-cash $1.4 billion transaction. Specifically, the Court concluded that while the single-bidder sale process was not unreasonable per se … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 1 Comment  
Editor's Tweet: Sullivan & Cromwell Discusses last week's new development in Delaware on "Don't Ask, Don't Waive" Standstills

An Incentive-Compatible Alternative to “Don’t Ask Don’t Waive” Standstills

In a recent essay forthcoming in the Delaware Journal of Corporate Law (available on SSRN), we argue that the current controversy over “Don’t Ask, Don’t Waive” standstills in M&A practice highlights the need to apply mechanism design to change-of-control transactions.[1]  Mechanism design is a Nobel Prize-winning theory based on incentive compatibility, whereby algorithmic procedures render it in the parties’ interests to be forthcoming, or truthful about their “bottom lines,” rather than relying exclusively on ex-post enforcement.

A.  The Tension Between Deal Certainty and Value Maximization in M&A Transactions

In M&A auctions, the board’s duty to maximize … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: NYU's Professor Steven J. Brams discusses An Incentive-Compatible Alternative to “Don’t Ask Don’t Waive” Standstills

Do Impending Delaware Law Changes Mean a Seismic Shift for Cash Tender Offers in Business Combinations?

Delaware appears almost certain to adopt changes that would become effective August 1 to the Delaware General Corporation Law (DGCL) which would change the process for back-end mergers after a tender offer closes.

Under this change,  a Buyer of over 50 percent (instead of the current threshold of over 90 percent) of shares of the Target will be able to effect a short-form merger without the burdensome and lengthy process of a further proxy solicitation and stockholder vote, which, by definition, the Buyer always wins.

Such DGCL amendments represent the most significant shift in the balance between usage of a … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Will impending Delaware law changes mean a seismic shift for cash tender offers in business combinations?

How VCs Induce Entrepreneurial Teams to Sell Startups

Venture capitalists (VCs) play a significant role in the financing of high-risk, technology-based business ventures. VC exits usually take one of three forms: an initial public offering (IPO) of a portfolio company’s shares, followed by the sale of the VC’s shares into the public market; a “trade sale” of the company to another firm; or dissolution and liquidation of the company.

Of these three types of exits, IPOs have received the most scrutiny. This attention is not surprising. IPO exits tend to involve the largest and most visible VC-backed firms. And, perhaps just as importantly, the IPO process triggers public-disclosure … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 2 Comments  
Editor's Tweet: Professor Jesse Fried of Harvard Law School discusses how VCs induce eintrepreneurial teams to sell startups

Gibson Dunn Discusses Proposed Amendments to DGCL Section 251 Increasing Attractiveness of Tender Offer Structure

The Delaware State bar recently proposed an amendment to Section 251 of the Delaware General Corporation Law (DGCL) to add new subparagraph (h) that would greatly enhance the appeal of the tender offer over a one-step merger structure.

Currently, bidders can usually consummate an acquisition more quickly as a tender offer compared to a one-step merger.  If, however, the bidder is unable to reach the 90% threshold necessary to effect a short form merger, the bidder must prepare, file and mail to stockholders an information statement on Schedule 14C (which is subject to SEC review and comment) before a back-end … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Gibson Dunn Discusses Proposed Amendments to DGCL Section 251 Increasing Attractiveness of Tender Offer Structure

Wachtell Lipton Discusses Proposed Amendments to Delaware Law that Would Facilitate Tender Offer Structures

The Delaware bar has recently proposed an amendment to the Delaware General Corporation Law that is likely to facilitate the use of tender offer structures, especially in private equity deals.  The new proposed Section 251(h), which is expected to be approved by the legislature and governor with an effective date of August 1, would permit inclusion of a provision in a merger agreement eliminating the need for a stockholder meeting to approve a second-step merger following a tender offer, so long as the buyer acquires sufficient shares in the tender offer to approve the merger (i.e., 50% of the outstanding … Read more

Editor's Tweet | 1 Comment  
Editor's Tweet: Wachtell Lipton Discusses Proposed Amendments to Delaware Law that Would Facilitate Tender Offer Structures

Delaware Supreme Court Reverses Chancery and Gives Collateral Estoppel Effect to California Federal Court’s Dismissal of Derivative Claims

In its widely followed Allergan decision, the Delaware Court of Chancery declined to apply collateral estoppel to dismiss a Delaware derivative complaint even though a California federal court dismissed (with prejudice) essentially the same complaint brought by different stockholders. The Court of Chancery had reasoned that there was no privity between the derivative stockholders because, until a stockholder survives a motion to dismiss based on failure to make demand, the stockholder is not acting on behalf of the corporation. Moreover, the Court of Chancery found that the California plaintiffs were inadequate representatives because they filed suit before seeking corporate books … Read more

Editor's Tweet |
Editor's Tweet: Delaware Supreme Court Reverses Chancery and Gives Collateral Estoppel Effect to California Federal Court's Dismissal of Derivative Claims