Delaware’s Long Silence on Corporate Officers

Delaware has reigned as the preeminent corporate law jurisdiction in the United States for over a century, weathering the rivalry of eager state competitors (such as Maryland and Nevada) and the looming presence of – and occasional intervention by – the federal government.  Various explanations have been provided as to why Delaware continues to dominate.  And various assessments have been offered as to whether, overall, Delaware’s corporate law jurisprudence is beneficial or detrimental for investors.  These explanations and assessments typically focus on what Delaware has done well over the years to retain its supremacy, not on what, deliberately or fortuitously, … Read more

The Dwindling of Revlon

In this blog post, I trace why my co-author Rob Ricca and I have concluded that the landmark 1986 Revlon ruling is, today, an insipid and remedially insignificant doctrine.  Its overly exalted place in M&A law endures because it is wrongly regarded in narrow, silo-like doctrinal isolation, even though it can only be understood as one part of a legal landscape that has dramatically changed since the mid-1980s.

The iconic Revlon doctrine has been an assumed, accepted, and integral part of M&A law for almost three decades.  In Revlon, the Delaware Supreme Court ruled that, in a corporate break-up sale, … Read more

The Unnecessary Business Judgment Rule

Lyman Johnson is the Robert O. Bentley Professor of Law at Washington & Lee University School of Law. 

A few weeks ago Chancellor Leo Strine, in a widely-heralded ruling, held that the business judgment rule standard of review applied to controlling shareholders in a self-dealing transaction if two conditions were met.  From the outset, the transaction must be subject to the approval of both (i) an independent special committee complying with its fiduciary duties, and (ii) a majority of the minority shareholders in a fully-informed and non-coerced vote.

I argue that Chancellor Strine should not have used a business judgment … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Professor Lyman Johnson of Washington & Lee Law discusses The Unnecessary Business Judgment Rule