Re-energizing the IPO Market

In the policy-oriented paper, “Re-energizing the IPO Market,”which will be published in the 2013 Brookings Press book Restructuring to Speed Economic Recovery, I summarize results from a number of my related co-authored papers and address why IPO volume, and especially small company IPO volume, has been so depressed for more than a decade.

From 1980-2000, an annual average of 310 operating companies went public in the U.S. During 2001-2011, on average only 99 operating companies went public. This decline occurred in spite of the doubling of real gross domestic product (GDP) during this 32-year period. The decline … Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Leading expert on IPOs, Professor Jay Ritter (University of Florida) provides a summary of his work on why IPO volume continues to be so low

Professor Robert J. Jackson Jr. Moderates Debate on Financial Innovation

Columbia Law School Professor Robert J. Jackson Jr. recently moderated a lively debate on financial innovation before a panel of experts including Congressman Barney Frank, The New York Times’ Andrew Ross Sorkin, Nobel Laureate Robert Solow, and Gary Gensler, chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

The full press release can be viewed here and the entire debate can be viewed here.… Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Professor Robert J. Jackson Jr. of Columbia Law School Moderates Debate on Financial Innovation, http://wp.me/p2Xx5U-b5

Towards a Legal Theory of Finance

The paper, Towards a Legal Theory of Finance, develops the building blocks for a legal theory of finance (LTF). By placing law at the center of the analysis of financial systems LTF sheds light on the construction of financial markets, their interconnectedness and thus vulnerability to crisis, and situates power where law is elastic or suspended in the name of financial stability. LTF has four elements: It holds that modern financial markets are (1) rule-bound systems; (2) essentially hybrid; (3) beset by the law-finance paradox; (4) and in the last instance subject to discretionary rather than rule-bound actions.

Rule-bound Read more

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Editor's Tweet: Professor Katharina Pistor of Columbia Law School presents her new paper , which develops the building blocks for a legal theory of finance.